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Oh, the places your ashes will go!

Want to be cremated, but worry that your ashes will just end up buried in a cemetery or sitting in some boring urn? Fear not! Have a look at these 10 bizarre places that ashes have gone.

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Into Fireworks
Writer Hunter S. Thompson literally went out with a bang. Thompson’s appropriately gonzo 2005 memorial service featured a fireworks show in which each boom and crack dispersed some of the writer’s ashes. Johnny Depp underwrote the fireworks display at a cost of $2 million.

Onto a Frisbee
More than anyone, Edward “Steady Ed” Headrick was responsible for transforming the Frisbee from a fad toy into a valued piece of sporting equipment. While working as a manager at Wham-O, Headrick designed numerous improvements to the flying disc, and during the 1970s he created the sport of disc golf. Before his 2002 death, Headrick told his children that he wanted to have his ashes mixed into the plastic for a batch of Frisbees. His hope was that the proceeds from the sales could help establish a disc golf museum, but he also wanted to have a bit of fun. Headrick’s son Daniel later told the San Francisco Chronicle, “He said he wanted to end up in a Frisbee that accidentally lands on someone’s roof.”

Headrick’s wish came true, and the discs are quite valuable as collectors’ items now. A two-disc set fetches upwards of $200 on Amazon.

Into Space
Looking for the remains of ‘60s icon and LSD advocate Timothy Leary? You’re going to need a space shuttle. In 1997 Leary’s remains were on the first rocket to send cremated ashes into space. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry’s ashes went into orbit on the same flight. Space burial company Celestis will send a portion of anyone’s remains into the final frontier for a fee. According to the company’s website, your ashes can go into Earth orbit for $2,495, find their way into lunar orbit for $9,995, or make the trek into deep space for $12,500.

Read the rest at Mental_floss.

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1 Comment

  • PattyRyan_

    The sad fact is that many cremains have ignoble ends, gathering dusts on shelves, and often left in boxes ("until we decide what to do with them") or unclaimed from the funeral home, or left in undecours places including basements and garages. Far more than are ever launched into orbit. What’s wrong with cemeteries? They’re more dignified than garages shelves.

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